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Migration Guide

v9.0.0

Dropped support for Adobe ColdFusion 2016

Adobe has ended support for ACF 2016, and so must we.

SchemaBuilder's uuid split into guid() and uuid()

CFML's uuid does not match other languages; it's one character shorter. Because of this, the value from createUUID() cannot be used in some database column types like SQL Server's uniqueidentifier. This made for some confusion in SchemaBuilder since it wasn't clear if uuid meant CFML's definition or the wider world's definition.
So, the types have been split, following Lucee's pattern, into uuid (matching CFML's createUUID()) and guid (matching Java's UUID or createGUID() on Lucee).
If you are using uuid with 36 character UUIDs or SQL Server's uniqueidentifier columns, please migrate your uuid calls to guid.

Returning all rows from paginate when maxRows is 0 or lower

Popular grid frameworks like Quasar and Datatables use values of 0 or -1 to return all rows from a query. This is now supported in qb. Previously, it generated an invalid query (SELECT * FROM users LIMIT 0 OFFSET 0).
If this behavior is fine for your application, you don't need to change anything.
This behavior can be customized by providing a callback to the shouldMaxRowsOverrideToAll setting or init argument.
If you need to revert to the previous behavior, provide the following as the shouldMaxRowsOverrideToAll setting:
moduleSettings = {
"qb": {
"shouldMaxRowsOverrideToAll": function( maxRows ) {
return false;
}
}
};

autoDeriveNumericType is now the default

Introduced in 8.10.0, this feature uses separate SQL types for integers and decimals to increase performance in certain database grammars. This feature is now the default, but the previous behavior can be enabled by setting autoDeriveNumericType to false.
This behavior should be an improvement in most every case without any changes needed.
If you need to revert to the previous behavior, provide the following as the autoDeriveNumericType setting:
moduleSettings = {
"qb": {
"autoDeriveNumericType": false
}
};
Note: The option to revert to the old behavior will be removed in the next major version.

strictDateDetection is now the default

Introduced in 8.1.0, this feature only returns a SQL type of CF_SQL_TIMESTAMP if the param is a date object, not just a string that looks like a date. This helps avoid situations where some strings were incorrectly interpreted as dates. For many, the migration path is straightforward — calls to now() are already date objects as well as any function that operates on a date. If you need to parse a string as a date, the parseDateTime built-in function can accomplish that.
If you are relying on qb treating any strings as dates you will need to parse them as actual date objects first. (You can do so using functions like parseDateTime.
If you need to revert to the previous behavior, provide the following as the strictDateDetection setting:
moduleSettings = {
"qb": {
"strictDateDetection": false
}
};
Note: The option to revert to the old behavior may be removed in the next major version.

v8.0.0

Where clauses with an OR combinator are now automatically wrapped inside when callbacks

This isn't a breaking change that will affect most people. In fact, it will most likely improve your code.
Previously, when using the when control flow function, you were fully responsible for the wrapping of your where statements. For example, the following query:
qb.from( "users" )
.where( "active", 1 )
.when( len( url.q ), function( q ) {
q.where( "username", "LIKE", q & "%" )
.orWhere( "email", "LIKE", q & "%" );
} );
Would generate the following SQL:
SELECT *
FROM "users"
WHERE "active" = ?
AND "username" = ?
OR "email" = ?
The problem with this statement is that the OR can short circuit the active check.
The fix is to wrap the LIKE statements in parenthesis. This is done in qb using a function callback to where.
qb.from( "users" )
.where( "active", 1 )
.where( function( q ) {
q.where( "username", "LIKE", q & "%" )
.orWhere( "email", "LIKE", q & "%" );
} );
SELECT *
FROM "users"
WHERE "active" = ?
AND (
"username" = ?
OR "email" = ?
)
When using the when control flow function, it was easy to miss this. This is because you are already in a closure - it looks the same as when using where to group the clauses.
In qb 8.0.0, when will automatically group added where clauses when needed. That means our original example now produces the SQL we probably expected.
// qb 8.0.0
qb.from( "users" )
.where( "active", 1 )
.when( len( url.q ), function( q ) {
q.where( "username", "LIKE", q & "%" )
.orWhere( "email", "LIKE", q & "%" );
} );
SELECT *
FROM "users"
WHERE "active" = ?
AND (
"username" = ?
OR "email" = ?
)
Grouping is not needed if there is no OR combinator. In these cases no grouping is added.
// qb 8.0.0
qb.from( "users" )
.where( "active", 1 )
.when( url.keyExists( "admin" ), function( q ) {
q.where( "admin", 1 )
.whereNotNull( "hireDate" );
} );
SELECT *
FROM "users"
WHERE "active" = ?
AND "admin" = ?
AND "hireDate IS NOT NULL
If you had already wrapped your expression in a group inside the when callback, nothing changes. Your code works as before. The OR combinator check only works on the top most level of added where clauses.
qb.from( "users" )
.where( "active", 1 )
.when( len( url.q ), function( q ) {
q.where( function( q2 ) {
q2.where( "username", "LIKE", q & "%" )
.orWhere( "email", "LIKE", q & "%" );
} );
} );
SELECT *
FROM "users"
WHERE "active" = ?
AND (
"username" = ?
OR "email" = ?
)
Additionally, if you do not add any where clauses inside a when callback, nothing changes from qb 7.
The breaking change part is if you were relying on these statements residing at the same level without grouping. In those cases, you may pass the withoutScoping flag to the when callback.
// qb 8.0.0
qb.from( "users" )
.where( "active", 1 )
.when(
condition = len( url.q ),
onTrue = function( q ) {
q.where( "username", "LIKE", q & "%" )
.orWhere( "email", "LIKE", q & "%" );
},
withoutScoping = true
);
SELECT *
FROM "users"
WHERE "active" = ?
AND "username" = ?
OR "email" = ?

v7.0.0

Lucee 4.5 and Adobe ColdFusion 11 EOL

Support for Lucee 4.5 and Adobe ColdFusion 11 has been dropped. If you need support for these engines, please remain on an earlier version of qb.

MSSQLGrammar renamed to SqlServerGrammar

MSSQLGrammar was visually too close to MySQLGrammar and was hard to differentiate quickly. SqlServerGrammar is much more unique and easily identifiable. Additionally, more people that use this library refer to their database engine as "SQL Server" than "MSSQL".
To migrate, replace any instances of MSSQLGrammar with SqlServerGrammar. Make sure to also append the @qb namespace, if needed, as explained below.

Variadic Parameters Support Removed

Variadic parameter support was the ability to pass any number of arguments to certain methods like select.
qb.select( "name", "email", "createdDate" );
This code came with a slight performance cost and readability cost. That, combined with the fact that the above syntax is very close to an array, we are dropping support for variadic parameters. To migrate, wrap instances of variadic parameters in an array:
qb.select( [ "name", "email", "createdDate" ] );

defaultGrammar updated to be the full WireBox mapping

In previous versions, the value passed to defaultGrammar was used to look up a mapping in the @qb namespace. This made it difficult to add or use grammars that weren't part of qb. (You could get around this be registering your custom grammar in the @qb namespace, but doing so seemed strange.)
To migrate this code, change your defaultGrammar to be the full WireBox mapping in your moduleSettings:
moduleSettings = {
"qb": {
"defaultGrammar": "MSSQLGrammar@qb"
}
};

value method argument order changed

A defaultValue parameter and optional exception throwing was added to value. This pushed the options struct to the end of the method. If you are using positional parameters with value, you will need to update your method calls to either use named parameters or the new positions.
public any function value(
required string column,
string defaultValue = "",
boolean throwWhenNotFound = false,
struct options = {}
);

Some methods renamed callback to query

All methods that could conceivably take a subquery as well as a value now accept a closure or another builder instance to use as a subquery. This led to changing the callback argument to query in the following cases:
  • whereSub
  • whereInSub
  • whereExists
  • orWhereExists
  • whereNotExists
  • andWhereNotExists
  • orWhereNotExists
  • whereNullSub
  • orderBySub
  • subSelect
If you are using named parameters with any of the above methods you will need to migrate your method calls.

v5.0.0

Version v5.0.0 brings support for SchemaBuilder inside qb. To avoid naming confusion, Builder was renamed to QueryBuilder. Any references in your code to Builder@qb need to be updated to QueryBuilder@qb.